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impossible country a journey through the last days of Yugoslavia by Brian Hall

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Published by Secker & Warburg in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Hall, Brian, -- 1959- -- Travel -- Yugoslavia.,
  • Yugoslavia -- History -- 1980-1992.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementBrian Hall.
The Physical Object
Paginationx, 422 p. :
Number of Pages422
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18517416M
ISBN 100436200325
LC Control Number94004356

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In The Impossible Country, Brian Hall relates his encounters with Serbs, Croats, and Muslims— “real people, likeable people” who are now overcome with suspicion and anxiety about one another. Hall takes the standard explanations, the pundits’ predictions, and the evening news footage and inverts our perceptions of the country, its Cited by: In addition, Tudors book has the special advantage of being a recently released () comment on a country that desperately needs foreign interpreters. Sandwiched between the great Asian powers (China and Japan) and divided by the 20th Korea: The impossible country by Daniel Tudor answers just about every challenge an introduction to a foreign /5. The Impossible Country: A Journey Through the Last Days of Yugoslavia by Hall, Brian and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at Impossible Country Brian Hall, Author David R. Godine Publisher $ (p) ISBN More By and About This Author Hall's account, which he modestly calls a travel book, is an.

  In Korea: The Impossible Country, Tudor examines Korea's cultural foundations; the Korean character; the public sphere in politics, business, and the workplace as well as the family, dating, and marriage. In doing so, he touches on topics as diverse as shamanism, clan-ism, the dilemma posed by North Korea, the myths about doing business in 5/5(1).   His first book Korea: The Impossible Country received high praise and has been translated into Korean, Chinese, Polish, and Thai. A subsequent book, North Korea Confidential (with James Pearson), was selected by The Economist as one of the best books of He is also co-founder of Seoul-based The Booth Brewing Company.1/5(1). Korea: The Impossible Country consists of twenty-eight chapters that are largely independent, mostly tackling one feature of Korean culture or society or politics or economics. There is some historical background, but the focus is on contemporary South Korea and its recent history. Daniel Tudor was the Korea correspondent for The Economist and his pieces are pitched at that kind of quality.   A TERRIBLE COUNTRY By Keith Gessen pp. Viking. $ When I was an undergraduate, I took a poetry class with a well-known poet. We met during his office hours to discuss a poem I’d turned in Author: Boris Fishman.

An incisive and affecting Yugoslavian travelogue from May to mid-September , just as the country split up and its former republics went to war. Hall (Stealing from a Deep Place, , etc.) professes no solutions for the current Balkan trauma. Rather, he offers an elegy of sorts for the promise of humanism and an eyewitness account of the balkanization of mind and action. ``Even. Get this from a library! Korea: the impossible country. [Daniel Tudor] -- "Long overshadowed by Japan and China, South Korea is a small country that happens to be one of the great national success stories of the postwar period. From a failed state with no democratic. Get this from a library! Korea: the impossible country. [Daniel Tudor] -- Daniel Tudor is a journalist who has lived in and written about Korea for almost a decade. Tudor examines Korea's cultural foundations; the Korean character; the public sphere in politics, business.   This transformation is the subject of a new book, Korea: The Impossible Country, by Daniel Tudor, Korea correspondent for the Economist.'" —Time Magazine "Mr. Tudor pushes into new social and economic territory with his book, including the rising role of immigrants, multicultural families and even gay people in South Korea/5().