The effects of anxiety on restrained and unrestrained eaters
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The effects of anxiety on restrained and unrestrained eaters

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Published by National Library of Canada in Ottawa .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Thesis (M.A.)--University of Toronto, 1993.

SeriesCanadian theses = Thèses canadiennes
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 microfiche : negative.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15101614M
ISBN 100315869712
OCLC/WorldCa46530460

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  This study examined the effects of active (AC) and passive coping (PC) stress tasks on food intake in female restrained (n=20) and unrestrained eaters (n=20).Participants completed a reaction time task (AC), a cold-pressor test (PC), and a relaxation control condition separated by Cited by: Restrained eaters are also less physically active after consuming fitness-branded food, and food consumption volumes mediate this effect in restrained eaters. Fitness branding may therefore have undesirable effects on the weight-control behaviors of restrained eaters because it discourages physical activity despite an increase in consumption Cited by:   Restrained and emotional eaters overeat in response to stress. To compare differential effects of cognitive demand and ego-threatening stressors on subsequent chocolate intake, 38 females completed a neutral (control), an ego threatening and an incongruent Stroop colour-naming task on three separate by:   The effect of deprivation on food cravings and eating behavior in restrained and unrestrained eaters. Int J Eat Disord. ; 38 (4): – [ PubMed ] [ Google Scholar ].

unrestrained eaters, restrained eaters were just as likely to start eating the M&Ms, regardless of food type for (p all main effects and interactions), but, as our results dem-. There was a significant moderating effect of restrained eating, with a hyperphagic response to work stress in restrained eaters, compared with no effect in unrestrained eaters. Conclusion: The results indicate that the associations between restraint and stress-induced eating that have been observed in the laboratory extend to the real-life setting. The relationship between emotion and eating has been explored in laboratory studies as well. Several studies have examined the effects of anxiety 2 on eating among restrained and unrestrained eaters (See Greeno & Wing, , for a summary). These studies have consistently shown that restrained eaters consume more when anxious than when not. In this study we examined the effects of anxiety and food deprivation on the amount of food consumed ad lib by dieters and nondieters. Eighty female college students served as subjects in an ostensible market research study in which an anxiety manipulation was embedded. Reassignment of the subjects to anxiety condition on the basis of self-reported anxiety produced a significant (p.

Compared to unrestrained eaters, restrained eaters were just as likely to start eating the M&Ms, regardless of food type (p > for all main effects and interactions), but, as our results demonstrate, restrained eaters found it more difficult to stop eating once they had started, particularly when eating the small food in small packages. This study examined the effects of active (AC) and passive coping (PC) stress tasks on food intake in female restrained (n = 20) and unrestrained eaters (n = 20) Participants completed a reaction.   This study investigated the attentional control of restrained eaters when exposed to food. Restrained (N = 55) and unrestrained eaters (N = 56) completed a color word Stroop –down attentional control was assessed by adaptation effects (the Stroop effect is smaller when the previous trial is an incongruent color word than a congruent color word). Restrained eaters attend more strongly to food- and diet-related cues than do unrestrained eaters, as evidenced in both their eating behavior and their attention and memory responses to such cues.